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1 Date to be checked with Ann Cossar. COSSAR, Alice Sarah (I625)
 
2 Date to be checked with Ann Cossar. COSSAR, Alice Sarah (I625)
 
3 *Killed in action whilst in His Majestys Service.
See d:\data\bk6\quill\notes\00000254\Thomas Pace Quill.htm for Commonwealth War Graves Commission HTML files 
QUILL, Thomas Pace (I254)
 
4 *Marriage to spouse 242, Daniel QUILL needs to be verified. SHEPHERD, Emily Florence (I248)
 
5 *Marriage to spouse 248, Emily Florence SHEPHERD needs to be verified. QUILL, Daniel (I242)
 
6 1881 Census Extract for Richard Brackenbury.

Dwelling: 2 Park Road
Census Place: Horton In Bradford, York, England
Source: FHL Film 1342067 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 4461 Folio 28 Page 1
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
Richard BRACKENBURY M 41 M Turton, Lincoln, England
Rel: Head
Occ: Labourer For Mason
Jane BRACKENBURY M 39 F Sleaford, Lincoln, England
Rel: Wife
Ann BRACKENBURY U 18 F Helpringham, Lincoln, England
Rel: Daur
Occ: Worsted Spinner
Elizabeth BRACKENBURY U 16 F Helpringham, Lincoln, England
Rel: Daur
Occ: Worsted Spinner
Fanny BRACKENBURY U 14 F Helpringham, Lincoln, England
Rel: Daur
Occ: Worsted Spinner
Thomas BRACKENBURY U 12 M Helpringham, Lincoln, England
Rel: Son
Occ: Scholar
John BRACKENBURY U 9 M Helpringham, Lincoln, England
Rel: Son
Occ: Scholar
Jane BRACKENBURY U 6 F Huerby, Lincoln, England
Rel: Daur
Occ: Scholar

1881 British Census
19/05/00 Copyright (c) 1999 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

NB: Original extract from 1881 British Census CD had Kelpringham, not Helpringham.
Correction to mis-spelling by Simon Quill. 
BRACKENBURY, Richard (I6)
 
7 Address at 1881 Census, 66 Forston St, Shoreditch, London, Middlesex, England
Address at 1901 Census, 15 Carysfort Road, Stoke Newington, Hackney Nth Division, Parish of St Mary, London 
QUILL, Maurice (I731)
 
8 At one time had an office in Red Lion Square, Cannon Street, London, E4.
Was an accountant, at one time an auditor for Hambro's Bank.
In his spare time he also audited United Daries books. (VR) 
RIDOUT, Arthur Trevor (I46)
 
9 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. ROGERSON, Angela (I466)
 
10 Birth 1860 sep St Geo East 1C 424 Death AMBROSE, Amy (I21)
 
11 Birth certificate for Son Henry T Dixon shows her maiden make as Tompkins
Marriage index entry for marriage to Henry Dixon shows Tomkies. Have ordered certificate from GRO. 
TOMKIES, Amelia Eliza (I13)
 
12 Birth Marriage 1865 Jun Newington 1D 312 Death ROLPH, Charles (I38)
 
13 Buried in grave 8315H at 3:30 P.M. SKINNER, Stephen Samuel (I65)
 
14 Could also be named Georgina Catherine CANFIELD CANFIELD, Cathleen Georgina (I68)
 
15 Daily Telegraph Obituaries, February 21, 1996.


JEFFERY KINDERSLEY QUILL . 1913 -- 1996

JEFFREY QUILL who has died at the age of 83, was a great test pilot who
earned the title "Mr. Spitfire".

Not only did he prepare the celebrated fighter for service, but,
remarkably for a test pilot, saw action as a fighter pilot during the
Battle of Britain. He shot down two enemy aircraft before returning to
his own hazardous speciality.

It was in 1936 that Matt Summers, then Vickers chief test pilot, first
flew the Spitfire. Quill, his assistant, was the second pilot to fly it.

Quill and his team put through their paces some 52 operational variants
of a production total of 27,500 Spitfires.

Through hours of painstaking test-flying he helped the Spitfire -- and
many other airplanes -- to perform as their designers had hoped they
would.

In Quill's day, designers could not call upon computers or large wind
tunnels to help them get it right, nor could test pilots use flight
simulators; so he risked his life as soon as he took prototypes off the
ground for the first time.

By the summer of 1940 and the Battle of Britain, Quill had turned R. J.
Mitchell's concept into an integrated fighting machine.

True, the sturdier Hurricane (designed by Hawker's Sydney Camm) far
outnumbered the speedier Spitfire in the Battle of Britain. But Quill
had brought the Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire to the point where it could
tackle enemy Me109 escorting fighters while Hurricanes took on the
bombers.

As the fighting swayed across the south of England, Quill ached to join
in. There was no problem about his qualifications. He had served as an
RAF fighter pilot in the early 1930s. He feared, however, that the
application to join a squadron would be opposed because of his unique
value as a test pilot.

To meet this objection, he persuaded Vickers that he could do little
more for the Spitfire without gaining first hand experience of combat,
or "a spot of practical" as he put it. After some string pulling, the
RAF went along with the scheme, and on August 5, 1940, he was posted to
No. 65 squadron at Hornchurch.

But, after he had shot down an Me109 and a Heinkel 111 bomber, he was
told to put his flying officer's uniform back in mothballs and return to
the Supermarine works at Southampton.

As a result of his experience, a number of production changes were
swiftly introduced. Vitally, aileron control at high speed was improved.

Combat had also taught Quill that pilots were getting shot down by an
enemy they could not see. The optical qualities of the windscreen side
panels were defective; worse, the rear fuselage and the canopy impeded
rear vision. After his report, the design was changed.

Quill was an exceptionally articulate test pilot, and he gained a
reputation as an outstanding troubleshooter. This helped him secure a
second spell of Service flying when, in 1943, the Admiralty was
confronted by problems with aircraft carrier operations.

He was commissioned as a lieutenant commander in the air branch of the
RNVR, and so escaped from the works for another five months.

The Sea Spitfire, or Seafire as the Fleet Air Arm variant became known,
was available from 1941, but ran into difficulties, particularly when
operating from escort carriers whose decks were 30 per cent shorter than
those of the big fleet carriers.

Quill undertook innumerable deck landings which suggested was to modify
future production of Seafires and the training of their pilots. He
enjoyed the Navy and was saddened when told to change out of uniform for
the second time.

Jeffrey Kindersley Quill was born on Feb 1, 1913. When he was five, an
airplane landed and another crashed on the common between his Sussex
home at Littlehampton and the sea. He always said that these events
determined him to fly.

In 1931 he entered the RAF from Lancing College on a short service
commission, being unable to afford a cadetship at the RAF college
Cranwell because of the death of his father.

He went solo on an Avro Tutor after five hours' dual instruction. The
next year he passed out with the rating "exceptional" and was posted to
No. 17, a fighter squadron stationed at Upavon, equipped with Bristol
Bulldogs.

Later he would reflect ruefully on what he saw as a scandal; that, seven
years before the outbreak of the 1939-45 war, RAF fighters were little
more than derivatives of RFC machines of the 1914-18 war.

At the end of 1933, Quill was posted to the Meteorological Flight at
Duxford near Cambridge. He welcomed the challenge and occupational
hazard of flying obsolescent Siskins in all weathers. He accomplished the
astonishing feat of completing a year, irrespective of normally
unflyable conditions, without missing one Met Flight daily climb. He was
awarded the AFC. Late in 1935, he was tipped off that Mutt Summers, the
Vickers chief test pilot, was looking for a young assistant. He was
disinclined at first to pass up the possibility of a permanent
commission, but was persuaded to fly down to Brooklands for interviews
by Summers and Sir Robert McLean, the chairman of Vickers Aviation.

He accepted the post at ?500 per year. The RAF released him, and from
Jan 1, 1936 he became busily employed testing aircraft produced by
Vickers and it's subsidiary, Supermarine.

These include the Vildebeest torpedo-bomber, Valentia transport and a
prototype Venom fighter (eventually abandoned in favour of the Spitfire,
which performed better).

Mutt Summers first flew "The Fighter", as the prototype K5054 was known
in the works, on March 6, 1936. On March 26 he invited Quill to take her
up.

The more Quill flew her, the more convinced he became, as he was to
recall, "this airplane was of immense importance". On June 18 that year,
a recurring fear that he might crash the one and only Spitfire was
almost realised on the day it was unveiled to the press.

At the last minute, it was found to have an untraceable engine oil leak.
To fly or not to fly? Mitchell settled the matter. Tersely he told
Quill: "Get in and fly it".

He was just airborne when, to his horror, he saw the oil pressure
gauge drop to zero. There was no alternative but to climb sufficiently
to turn, and land despite the very high risk of engine seizure and a
crash.

The fault was traced, a new Rolls-Royce Merlin engine was substituted
and the Spitfire survived what might have been curtains.

Shortly after this accident, the RAF sought to attract Quill back with
the offer of a permanent commission. He had hardly turned it down after
"much heart aching" when his life was imperilled again.

He was giving a Wellesley geodetic bomber it's production test when at
12,000 ft, the single-engined monoplane lurched into a right handed spin
and failed to respond to normal recovery action. At 3,000 ft he baled
out.

After this escape, he was more certain than ever that his destiny lay
entirely with the Spitfire and he moved from Vickers at Weybridge to
Supermarine.

With the outbreak of war and the demand for more and more ever-improving
Spitfires during and after the Battle of Britain, Quill was sorely
stretched.

Yet from time to time there were moments of welcome relief as when, in
the summer of 1940, Lord Beaverbrook, the Minister for Aircraft
Production, who had invited him to dinner, failed to join Quill and his
fellow guests.

At the cigar stage, the Beaver was discovered slumped in sleep over his
desk in an adjoining room. The press baron was as much a casualty of the
hour as were the fatigued fighter pilots for whom he was driving on
fighter production.

There was also the bizarre plot -- Operation Airthief -- hatched by
Captain Philip Pinkney of 12 commando to paddle Quill ashore near a
German airfield in France with the aim of stealing an Fw190 fighter
about which details were urgently required.

Quill mugged up every available piece of intelligence about the new
fighter. He had also undergone a strenuous commando fitness and Folbot
canoe paddling regime before the exploit was called off. The surrender
at Pembrey in Wales by Oberleutenant Arnim Faber of a pristine Fw190 had
made such a perilous exploit unnecessary.

The end of the war brought Quill, now Supermarine's senior test pilot,
no respite. The jet age had arrived and with it an experimental
Supermarine design, the E.10/44, or Spiteful. Quill was climbing it on a
June day in 1947 when he lost consciousness at about 40,000 ft. Coming
to at 10,000 ft he landed safely but medical checks revealed the toll 16
years of hard flying had taken.

Three months' leave failed to restore his health fully. He had to accept
that he wound never test high-performance fighters again -- though 30
years after his first flight in Mitchell's prototype, he flew a Spitfire
for the last time in 1966.

"Flying a desk" did not come easily, but he made a great success of it
with Vickers-Armstrong, the British Aircraft Corporation and as a
director of Sepecat, the company which administered the Jaguar
programme.

He served also as marketing director of Panavia, the
Anglo-German-Italian consortium which developed the Tornado multi-role
combat aircraft.

In Munich on this programme, he shared an office with Willi
Messerschmitt, creator of the Me109, opponent of the Spitfire in the
Battle of Britain.

Quill retired in 1978. In 1983 he published 'Spitfire. A Test Pilot's
Story'.

Quill was awarded the AFC in 1936, appointed OBE in 1942 and elected
fellow of the Royal Aeronautic Society in 1980. 
QUILL, Jeffrey Kindersley (I185)
 
16 Date of death taken from "British India Office Pension Registers - Orphans Transcription" for M Luther Holden Alder WATSON WATSON, George Alder (I164)
 
17 Devon Marriages Transcription on FindMyPast Family (F173)
 
18 Devon Marriages Transcription on findmypast.co.uk Family (F172)
 
19 Died Edinburgh Royal Infirmary, 685/5 George Square, Scotland. Prostatic hypertrophy, cystitis, ascending pylitis with senility. Occupation: Keeper of the Robes, Court of Session, Edinburgh (Bef 1908 - 1925) COSSAR, Edwin (James) (I47)
 
20 Fred Leeks known as "Good Time Charlie"! (VR) LEEKS, Reginald Frederick (I602)
 
21 Gloucestershire Echo, 23 Jan 1937
Cheltenham Cronicle, 30 Jan 1937 
HOLDEN, Beatrice Blandina (I168)
 
22 Gloucestershire Echo, 23 Jan 1937
Funeral notice for Beatrice Blandina Watson
"Her eldest son, Capt. George Watson (O.C.), while serving with the 11th Lancers (Probyn's Horse), was fatally injured in 1927 at the Lucknow Races." 
WATSON, George Holden Alder (I170)
 
23 Grantham Journal, 12th October 1889 Family (F184)
 
24 International Genealogical Index (TM) - 1988 Edition - Version 2.17

02 MAY 1993 SELECTED ENTRIES
==============================================================================================================
Batch Library Call Number
Names (Sex) Event Date/Place & Sheet For Source Document
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

QUILL, James (M)....................... C: 11 Dec 1831 C038081 106728
Father: James QUILL Lonan, Isle Of Man, England Printout: 0933168
Mother: Jane CAWLEY

Note: Jane's Surname could be COWLEY 
QUILL, James (I1)
 
25 International Genealogical Index (TM) - 1988 Edition - Version 2.17

02 MAY 1993 SELECTED ENTRIES
==============================================================================================================
Batch Library Call Number
Names (Sex) Event Date/Place & Sheet For Source Document
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

QUILL, James (M)....................... M: 22 Mar 1828 M038081 106728
Spouse: Jane CAWLEY Lonan, Isle Of Man, England Printout: 1238723

Note. Jane's surname could be COWLEY 
QUILL, James (I588)
 
26 International Genealogical Index (TM) - 1988 Edition - Version 2.17

02 MAY 1993 SELECTED ENTRIES
==============================================================================================================
Batch Library Call Number
Names (Sex) Event Date/Place & Sheet For Source Document
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

QUILL, Jane (F)........................ C: 26 Oct 1828 C038081 106728
Father: James QUILL Lonan, Isle Of Man, England Printout: 0933168
Mother: Jane COWLEY

Note: Jane's Surname could be CAWLEY 
QUILL, Jane (I590)
 
27 International Genealogical Index (TM) - 1988 Edition - Version 2.17

02 MAY 1993 SELECTED ENTRIES
==============================================================================================================
Batch Library Call Number
Names (Sex) Event Date/Place & Sheet For Source Document
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

QUILL, John James (M).................. C: 30 Apr 1877 C038081 106728
Father: Joseph Albert QUILL Lonan, Isle Of Man, England Printout: 0933168
Mother: Elizabeth CALLISTER 
QUILL, John James (I595)
 
28 International Genealogical Index (TM) - 1988 Edition - Version 2.17

02 MAY 1993 SELECTED ENTRIES
==============================================================================================================
Batch Library Call Number
Names (Sex) Event Date/Place & Sheet For Source Document
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

QUILL, Joseph (M)...................... C: 16 Feb 1845 C038081 106728
Father: James QUILL Lonan, Isle Of Man, England Printout: 0933168
Mother: Jane COWLEY

Note: Jane's Surname could be CAWLEY

QUILL, Joseph (M)...................... M: 5 Jun 1875 M038241 106176
Spouse: Elizabeth CALLISTER Patrick, Isle Of Man, England Printout: 1238723 
QUILL, Joseph Albert (I592)
 
29 International Genealogical Index (TM) - 1988 Edition - Version 2.17

02 MAY 1993 SELECTED ENTRIES
==============================================================================================================
Batch Library Call Number
Names (Sex) Event Date/Place & Sheet For Source Document
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

QUILL, Joseph Henry (M)................ C: 9 Apr 1876 C038081 106728
Father: Joseph Albert QUILL Lonan, Isle Of Man, England Printout: 0933168
Mother: Elizabeth CALLISTER 
QUILL, Joseph Henry (I594)
 
30 International Genealogical Index (TM) - 1988 Edition - Version 2.17

02 MAY 1993 SELECTED ENTRIES
==============================================================================================================
Batch Library Call Number
Names (Sex) Event Date/Place & Sheet For Source Document
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

QUILL, Margaret (F).................... C: 17 Jan 1834 C038081 106728
Father: James QUILL Lonan, Isle Of Man, England Printout: 0933168
Mother: Jane COWLEY

Note: Jane's Surname could be CAWLEY 
QUILL, Margaret (I591)
 
31 Lived in Gatley Buildings, Pimlico. Never married. Was Cook/Housekeeper. (VR) RIDOUT, Annie Edith (I598)
 
32 Lived in Humbledonm Sunderland (See spouses CWGC entry) COOK, Mary Elizabeth (I255)
 
33 Lived in Richmond Park Road, Richmond, SRY.
No Issue from the marriage and wanted to adopt Evelyn Annie RIDOUT.
Was evacuated to Leicester during WW2 (VR)

Gossip. When Lily died, Annie Edith Ridout was staying with her.
The house went to the Freemasons. Annie stripped the house completely of
cupboards etc. as the FMs had only been left the house and not the fittings. (VR) 
RIDOUT, Lily Gertrude (I416)
 
34 Mothers maiden name appears in various spellings in the St. Caths indexes. Kinchin Kitchen KINSHIN, Mildred (I79)
 
35 Not sure if Bettine's maiden name is McCulloch or Hancock.
Ernest jack is believed to be her second wife.
Gleaned from http://123-mcc.com/family_history_fallen.htm, entry for Philip Quill. 
MCCULLOCH, Bettine Stuart (I303)
 
36 Once lived in Pimlico, London, UK. RIDOUT, James (I44)
 
37 One of twins. The other, Mary, died. Used to live at 64 Water Lane Wilmslow, Cheshire. Was awarded the Bene Merenti by Pope John Paul II RIDOUT, Leslie (I432)
 
38 Only close match in Death Indexes.
1916, Romford, Essex, Jul, 4A 404 
TOMKIES, Amelia Eliza (I13)
 
39 Only close match in Death Indexes.
1916, West Ham, Essex, Apr, 4A 237 
DIXON, Henry (I12)
 
40 Possibly died Apr - Jun 1871 age 6 RIDOUT, Frederick (I768)
 
41 Possibly died Apr-Jun 1972 age 2 RIDOUT, George (I769)
 
42 Possibly one of twins.. RIDOUT, John Arthur (I421)
 
43 Possibly ran a baby's shop in Reading. (VR) RIDOUT, Mary (I651)
 
44 See 1881 Census data for Richard Brackenbury COVELL, Jane (I9)
 
45 See 1881 Census data for Richard Brackenbury BRACKENBURY, Ann (I10)
 
46 See 1881 Census data for Richard Brackenbury BRACKENBURY, Elizabeth (I707)
 
47 See 1881 Census data for Richard Brackenbury BRACKENBURY, Fanny (I708)
 
48 See 1881 Census data for Richard Brackenbury BRACKENBURY, Thomas (I709)
 
49 See 1881 Census data for Richard Brackenbury BRACKENBURY, John (I710)
 
50 See 1881 Census data for Richard Brackenbury BRACKENBURY, Jane (I711)
 

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